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About the Book

Beyond the Book

248 pp., 5.5 x 8.5, 13 illus., notes, bibl., index

Making Marriage Work

A History of Marriage and Divorce in the Twentieth-Century United States


By the end of World War I, the skyrocketing divorce rate in the United States had generated a deep-seated anxiety about marriage. This fear drove middle-class couples to seek advice, both professional and popular, in order to strengthen their relationships. In Making Marriage Work, historian Kristin Celello offers an insightful and wide-ranging account of marriage and divorce in America in the twentieth century, focusing on the development of the idea of marriage as "work." Throughout, Celello illuminates the interaction of marriage and divorce over the century and reveals how the idea that marriage requires work became part of Americans' collective consciousness.

About the Author

Kristin Celello is assistant professor of history at Queens College, City University of New York.


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